Anaesthesia Associates

Anaesthesia Associates

Physicians’ Assistant (Anaesthesia) (PA(A)s) were introduced in 2004 and are now established within many NHS hospitals. In July 2019 PA(A)s formally changed their name to Anaesthesia Associates (AAs), recognising their role within the anaesthesia team and also within medical associate professions.

Who are Anaesthesia Associates (AAs)?

Anaesthesia Associates are highly trained, skilled practitioners that work within an anaesthetic team under the direction and supervision of a Consultant Anaesthetist. All qualified AAs have successfully completed an Anaesthesia Associate Postgraduate Diploma (formerly Physicians’ Assistant (Anaesthesia) Postgraduate Diploma) and are encouraged to maintain their presence on the managed voluntary register held by the RCoA. Please note the RCoA and AAGBI position statements below.

What do AAs do?

AAs provide perioperative patient care in either a 1: 1 or 2:1 capacity depending on patient acuity. In a 2:1 model, one consultant anaesthetist supervises two AAs, or a trainee anaesthetist and an AA, providing anaesthetic care in two adjacent operating theatres. For patients with more complex needs, a 1:1 model may be employed where one AA works directly alongside a consultant anaesthetist to provide care for the patient (see the AA curriculum framework below).

AAs may be utilised to reduce operating theatre downtime, leading to increased throughput on operating lists and improved theatre utilisation. Depending on local needs, AAs may play a role in preoperative assessment, provision of sedation, cardiac arrest teams, and offer a range of other perioperative and non-perioperative support consistent with their scope of practice at qualification. AAs may prove beneficial in supporting education for colleagues and students, and are often engaged in local research projects and audits.

Training and Careers

Introduction of the AA role and training requires the support of individual NHS trusts or boards. See planning the introduction and training for Physicians' Assistants. Once this has been established, the main groups of people eligible to commence training as an AA are:

  • Registered healthcare professionals (examples are nurses or operating department practitioners) with at least three years clinical experience and/or degree level studies,
  • Graduates with a biomedical science or biological science 2:1 honours degree or better.

Currently AAs practice across a broad range of specialities, including day case surgery, robotic surgery, cardiac surgery and transplantation to name but a few. Many organisations have trained AAs to perform advanced skills such as regional and local anaesthesia procedures. In such instances, local training packages and governance policies are utilised to ensure a competent workforce where patient safety remains paramount.

Anaesthesia associates pathway

Anaesthesia associates pathway

Training and Education

University of Birmingham

The postgraduate diploma which all qualified AAs hold is studied over 24 months with an additional three months probationary period served in clinical practice to conclude training. The course comprises 12 modules which introduce trainee AAs to the clinical practice of anaesthesia, applied physics, the anaesthetic machine, and monitoring principles. In later modules trainees study anatomy and physiology related to anaesthesia and surgery.  The final assessments are based on the management of life-threatening emergencies and advanced practice. Weekly teaching and tutorials are delivered by a Consultant Anaesthetist through the university e-learning interface. A typical week may consist of a tutorial, two to four days in the clinical practice and the rest involving clinical skills training and self-directed study. The standards of training are high and demanding on individuals to ensure a high calibre of competent AA graduates. More details can be found at Birmingham University Website

Assessment and Examination

Successful graduation requires passing assessments at eight and 24 months that consists of MCQ exams, Clinical skills Workbook completion, Record of In Training Experience Diary, Tutor Assessments and at 24 months the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) that takes place at the Royal College of Anaesthetists. Only after this are practitioners awarded the status of Anaesthesia Associate and are invited to become an Affiliate of the Royal College of Anaesthetists. The RCoA, alongside the University of Birmingham, have a duty to ensure that the relevant standards are upheld to ensure highly skilled and safe to practice graduates.

Associated information

Anaesthesia associates register

 

A registration form to join the register is due on the website. In the meantime if you contact Chris Scorer (cscorer@rcoa.ac.uk) with your name, workplace, and current supervisor your details will be added to the voluntary register.